The Return of Serfdom to Britain

Friedrich von Hayek published in 1944 his very influential book “The Road to Serfdom,” a book which is the mainstay of today’s policy makers. He warned of the dangers of an over mighty state, one in which professionals such as doctors gave up their independence as private practitioners to become servants of the state. The doctors would no longer be able to practise medicine freely but have to follow the dictates of their employer, the government. He warned of the same trend happening to all professions whereby independent lawyers etc would be giving up their freedom to become to be subject to a new form of bondage which denied them the freedom to practise as they wished, they would become the new serfs, bound to the new state. However he was living in the age of totalitarianism and he feared what he saw the makings of a new totalitarian state in Britain. Britain did not become a totalitarian state, in fact the totalitarian state that Hayek so feared, the Soviet Union collapsed in 1990.

  
Image of Chinese serfs working in a field taken from http://www.chinadaily.com

This was a prophetic book in that it was right to predict a new serfdom, but wrong in predicting the source of this new serfdom. He believed that the free market was the organisational mechanism best designed to ensure freedom, as in the free market the individual was free to make their own choices, as there was no powerful over arching organisation making the choices for them. However what Hayek failed to realise that the free market would be a source of the new serfdom. What he overlooked was the inequality in power relationships, in free market it the most powerful players have the most influence. The most influential players are the big business corporations, they determine the conditions under which the free market operates and these are often detrimental to their employees and customers. What Hayek failed to realise was that the state could be a liberating factor as much as an enslaving one. He failed to see the wood amongst the trees, he could not envisage alternate model of the state, for him the state was an authoritarian organisation,one that always threatened to take away an individual’s freedom. Given that he was a refugee from Nazi Germany this misconception as to the nature of the state is understandable. 
Perhaps the best understanding of the role of the state as a liberating force comes from the writings of the 19th century sociologist Emile Durkheim. He explained that the state in the 19th century through introducing laws to protect the citizen from oppressive landlords and employers was liberating the individual from these many local tyrants. Legislation to protect employees from unsafe working conditions, working long hours and being given the right to form associations (Trade Unions) to protect their interests gave people a freedom that they had never enjoyed before. Throughout the 20th century developments in legislation gave rise to the welfare state, in which the individual was guaranteed freedom from want and protection against the evils that can result from individual misfortune. The significance of this freedom from want was never understood by the intelligentsia, the freedoms they valued were the political freedoms, freedom of expression, freedom from excessive state control. Economists overwhelming came from the privileged classes, two of the 20th century greats Hayek and Schumpeter were aristocrats and for them what mattered was being free from an oppressive government, not from want.
Hayek despite witnessing the horrendous poverty that he saw in Europe in the period of the Great Depression, never ceased to believe that the free market was the best means to solve these problems. State control and intervention in the economy he associated with the totalitarian states of Nazi Germany and Communist Russia. He saw freeing the economy from state control as the only way to ensure the survival of the democratic state, for him there could be no democratic state without the free market. It was from his work that the Neo-Liberal economic and political philosophy of developed. This has become the dominant philosophy of the political classes, but its adoption as the practical philosophy of government has not lead to greater freedom and a more democratic society, but a new subtle form of serfdom. 
What the Neo-Liberals with their demand for a small state and minimal interference in the economy were creating was a society for most that has less freedom than its predecessor, as it was the state that guaranteed so many freedoms. It was these freedoms that were attacked by the Neo-Liberal economists, as they saw them as an obstruction to smooth running of the free market. Labour regulations restricted the hours for which businesses could employ staff, placed limits on how they could be used and made workers more expensive by imposing payroll taxes to finance social welfare benefits. Successive Neo-Liberal governments removed these restrictions and cost impediments on how employers could use their workers and have created what is called a flexible labour market. However this market has created by removing all the protections that labour enjoyed from abusive employment practices. What the Neo-Liberals have created a new social system that has many aspects of the old feudal system, such as being bound to one employer.

Our leaders in Britain boast that they have created the most flexible and competitive labour market in Europe, ignoring the many abuses practices in this new labour market. The most obvious abuse is the practice of zero hours contracts, where workers are contracted to work for an employee, but are not given any fixed hours of work or even guaranteed any minimum hours of work, instead they must be ready to work when the employee needs them. There is a clause in these contracts that forbids them to look for alternative work in the hours when their employer does not need them, as that would prevent them being free to work for their employer when needed. They as with the feudal villein are bond to their employer, the first could not leave their village to find work elsewhere and the zero hours worker is forbidden to find any additional work with a new employer. This new serfdom is a little more humane as employees are free to change employers, not a right enjoyed by medieval serfs.
However this right is severely limited as the new serf must have found a job before they leave. They don’t have the option of leaving an abusive employer, unless they have alternative work as the new benefits system will deny benefits to any claimant they deemed to have made themselves intentionally unemployed. 
Then there are the workers of split shifts, usually this is in the retail trade. Workers are expected to work two short shifts a day, when the shop is busy or the employer needs them. Again they cannot look for alternative work for those hours of the day when they are not employed in the shop, as they must leave themselves free for the unexpected call from the employer who might need them if a staff member is sick. Again they as with the zero hours employer are bond to their employee.
Britain can boast of one of the highest employment rates in the European Union but this is because labour in Britain is cheap and employers are free to employ workers using the most exploitative labour practices. Is it really a success story when a postgraduate student from Spain comes to London to find work as a barista?
Initially this practice was confined to the fast food outlets but the practice has become widespread within the services industry and has begun to spread to the professions. Increasingly new staff at the universities are employed on these contracts as are some technician posts within hospitals.
What the proponents of the free market have failed to understand is the inequality of power relationships within the free market. The market is not a meeting place of equals but of unequals, and the latter will if not constrained by law exploit their power. Unequals are the rich and powerful and the big business corporations. Freed from the law restricting how the business can use it staff, it will use them in the ways that suit them best and that best is treating the staff badly. It should be of no surprise that slavery is now a concern in modern Britain. At present it is foreign residents importing bringing in domestic staff with them who are largely responsible, but there are disturbing cases of it happening with exploitative UK employers who force vulnerable people into what can only be described as slavery. When the law is removed from the from market employers can behave as badly as they please. Even those agencies that are supposed to enforce the few remaining employment laws are reduced to ineffectiveness through constant staff cuts.
The Neo-Liberals failed to realise a free the market in which there is freedom of choice, frees people to behave badly as there is no sanction on bad behaviour. Perhaps it is not unfair to compare the big corporations with the medieval robber barons as both sought to enrich themselves at the expense of the wider community. While the medieval baron would levy a charge on goods passing through his territory, a more sophisticated robbery is practised today. One example of this is the pharmaceutical industry. There a small company will discover a new drug but lack the resources to market it. They then enter into a marketing relationship with a large company to market and distribute this drug, usually this relationship becomes a takeover and by the larger company. However this large company adds a further cost onto the price of the drug, which they call development costs and then sell it at many times its original price. These new robber barons rob both their staff (through paying them minimal wages) and their customers by overcharging for their products. 
What Britain as do many other Western countries seem to be doing is to be lurching into a Neo-Medieval society which is dominated by the business corporation. A glance at the last election demonstrated this when all the parties claimed to be busy friendly, the people barely got a mention. Despite the dire housing crisis in London caused by lack of affordable accommodation not one political party in the election proposed any measure that would put have effectively ended the crisis, as that would have threatened the income of the large property companies that dominate the housing market. 
History never repeats but older historical patterns can reoccur in later historical periods. Contemporary serfdom is not as cruel or restrictive as that of medieval Britain, but it is similar in its essentials, that is the great corporations can as did the medieval Dukes freely dispose of the people at their command. While the medieval Dukes could direct the lives of their serfs in a number of ways, they for example could compel them to join their armies, transfer villages and the people that lived in them to another lord without any regard to the villagers wishes and could in addition control most aspects of their lives, today the great corporations can exercise similar powers over their workers. In today’s Britain the government can decide to transfer a public service into private ownership, usually with the consequence of a worsening of working conditions for the existing employees. In the name of cost efficiency wages are reduced, pension schemes terminated or emasculated and employment protections removed. All these negative changes occur without the workers being allowed to voice their opposition to these changes. Also the new privatised owner is free to dismiss any number of existing staff. These new petty tyrants have a similar decree of control over their workers lives as did the medieval baron. The withdrawal of the state has meant any pressure to ameliorate or remove the most abusive of employment practices has been removed. Now increasing the British people are entering into a new form of servitude quite alien to the freedoms of a modern democratic society.

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2 thoughts on “The Return of Serfdom to Britain

    1. I cannot disagree more, words do have meaning, we give words agreed meanings so as to share our common experience of reality. Post modernism is a carelessness in the use of language, if words were interchangeable or lacking clarity ideas cannot be shared. Derrida was very careful to attribute meanings to words, his philosophy was in part a demonstration of the need for clarity in language use. I think post modernism uses the methods it affects to discredit as authors such as Lyotard use words carefully and precisely to explain post modernism. In fact Lyotard’s work was inspired by Wittgenstein concept of language games and although Wittgenstein insists that language use is specific to particular social groups such as lawyers, words still have distinct and common meanings within that group.

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